Articles

 
Before you get anyone to read your brilliantly executed pilot script, you must first pitch them the idea for the series, and it must be clear, compelling, character-driven, and it must feel like a TV show, not like a movie. Put simply, the first thing you need to do is answer the deceptively simple question, “What is it?”   Read More
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When you read logline after logline, patterns emerge. These patterns are sometimes exact copies of each other, clichés based on expressions that are hammered into our heads in taglines we’ve seen on movie or show posters, or in voiceovers we heard in trailers by the late, great Don LaFontaine.   Read More
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InkTip was founded in 2000 before anyone turned to the Internet to find scripts or writers. With over 250 films made from scripts and writers found through the site, InkTip remains the number one place to go online for your next project. Find out what’s to come from InkTip’s innovator, Jerrol LeBaron, in this exclusive interview.   Read More
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Scripted television is exploding. And if you are a screenwriter with experience primarily in the feature-length form, then you would do yourself well to start learning how to write a pilot.   Read More
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The synopsis can vary wildly from writer to writer. Because I’ve seen such a variance as far as length and philosophy in synopses, I must state that the important thing to remember is that the synopsis is not written for the writer but for the reader. Yet many synopses I’ve read seem to ignore the reality of a typical script reader’s workload.   Read More
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Robert McKee’s name is as synonymous with screenwriting as Tony Robbins’ name is for personal development. Educating scores of writers, filmmakers, actors and more since 1984, Mckee has cemented his legacy teaching storytelling both in person and through his tome “Story.” Here, McKee answers some questions, including the ever-present “Should you write what you know?”   Read More
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You thought of an interesting premise and made sure your protagonist completed the hero’s journey. But your script still reads dry. It tends to drag. On top of that, you might have ideas for who can play the lead role, but you haven’t been able to think of whom else to cast for the other roles. One thing you’ve neglected: your supporting characters.   Read More
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Why do we let process get in the way of getting what we want? And on that note, what do we really want? The conclusion to our series on “Why Talented Writers Fail” goes into why we must re-evaluate what we want and how to get there. How does pain relate to our success? Last time, we looked at four roadblocks that obstruct writers from capitalizing on their talents.   Read More
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Why is it that some writers without much initial talent seem to develop very quickly? Or, how is it that writers who possess talent early on struggle to make progress? Last time, we looked at fixed vs. growth mindsets. Now, we’ll look at a variety of roadblocks that impede our progress. These roadblocks frustrate us, confuse us and deter us. But there is hope if we first recognize what they are.   Read More
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Each week during piano lessons, my piano teacher must have been frustrated that I didn’t practice enough that week yet I had enough talent to "get by" and move on to the next piece. Why was she frustrated? Because she knew I relied on talent. I had the wrong mindset. Does this sound familiar to you or someone you know?   Read More
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